Hickory Recurve Selfbow in an American Flatbow Style

Hickory Recurve Selfbow in an American Flatbow Style

The first video shows my Hickory Recurve Selfbow in an American Flatbow Style.
It’s 62 1/2″ tip to tip.
50#@28″.
Limbs about 1 5/8″ at the fades.
This was tough tillering then, and it took gave me quite a challenge after when I decided to recurve the tips. I steamed the ends and added a recurve. Waited a couple day and strung it.
I knew something didn’t look right, and it took me a minute to actually notice one of the recurves had straighten back out. Back in the steam but this time I set them it with heat. I figured I might as well heat treat the entire bow. I used the heat gun on high, kept it moving and got it warn enough to just start the color to turn. Probably took a total of 10 or 15 minutes.
Then I noticed one recurve was set more than the other due to one being set with heat and the other not. So once again I steamed the opposite end and got the two recurves the same. Lessons being learned by the boat loads.
After a couple days I decided it was time to string it back up. I literally could not string the bow. I simply was not strong enough. I’d bet at this point it was over 100#. So back to tillering i go. Starting back with the spoke shave. When I finally got a long string on it I was pulling 40# in about 4″. I didn’t have a lot of time over the next few days, but it amazed me the amount of work to get it back to 50#. I’ve probably got an hour or two every day this week. So my question, is it normal for heat treating to up the poundage that much.
Ultimately it was worth the work. It turned out to be a great shooting selfbow.

 

 

 

After shooting this for a while it took me on another adventure. It developed a break. The fix is here ->>

 

 

Chronograph Results

Name: 586 Gr Arrow Hickory Recurve
Shots: 6
Average: 125 ft/s
SD: 2 ft/s
Min: 122 ft/s
Max: 128 ft/s
Spread: 6 ft/s
Barometric Pressure: 30 in Hg
Temperature: 47 F

 

 

Eventually this bow failed again permanently. 

Leave a Reply